Inuglak School

P.O. Box 90, Whale Cove, NU, X0C 0J0, Canada

Phone 1 867 896 9300 Fax 1 867 896 9005

e-mail: inuglakwh@hotmail.com


Inuglak School is in Whale Cove, Nunavut. Students study in their native language, Inuktitut, from kindergarten to third grade. There are six classrooms from K to 11, a home economics/local culture classroom and a computer lab. The majority of the residents of Whale Cove are Inuit and have a traditional affinity to their language, culture and the land. Even in these modern times, caribou, fish, seal and whale are part of the diet. Grizzly bear and polar bear roam freely. People are at home on the land and the sea.

Infrastructure includes an airport, Issatik Co-operative store, several churches, a nursing station, a recreational centre, an office for the government of the hamlet, a housing authority, and two taxis.

Whale Cove is home to several hundred Inuit who live on a harsh land that provides caribou, arctic char, grizzly bear, polar bear, berries, and lots of fresh air and water about 50 miles south of Rankin Inlet, north of Arviat, home of Susan Aglukark. Arctic Travel has a good page about Whale Cove.


The school program is based on Alberta curricula with evolving adaptations for Nunavut and Inuit culture. The collective agreement for teachers is FNT Collective Agreement. Other useful education links to the Western Canadian Protocol curricula are BC, WCP and the Northwest Territories

Transportation is mostly by Air Canada (YXN) and barge for passengers and freight, respectively.

Important information relating to travel is available from Environment Canada

News and other information from the world is available from Bourque, two local radio stations, one of which is CBC, and cable television.

Check out these northern recipes!

Recommended Sites

STUDENTS' WORK

  • Local information

  • the economy

  • Nunavut Handbook

  • weather

  • a second opinion

  • National News

  • Nunatsiaq News

  • Fauna:



Picture Gallery

Bear, courtesy Tom Premi 4/5 class picture

Bear, courtesy Tom PremiBear, courtesy Tom Premi